elaine, 28, film student always, and the last to leave the theatre.

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August 1st
11:40
Via

Captain America: The Winter Soldier | Gag reel

July 31st
17:20

Breaking Bad: “Fly” 3x10 (Dir. Rian Johnson, Written by Sam Catlin and Moira Walley-Beckett). 

I’m still laughing about the “3’ Long THING”.  

13:20
It’s interesting, watching Lucy I was reminded of Her and Under the Skin. Though in very different ways, in all three, you play a character with a great desire and capacity for learning. Would you say there’s something you’re drawn to about that?
SCARLETT JOHANSSON: All three of those projects — Lucy, Her, and Under the Skin — have allowed me to explore and work from a very expansive place. I don’t have the same boundaries as most dramatic work. The rules don’t necessarily apply to these characters because they’re not even human. That has allowed me to step back and really examine human behavior in a way. As I know myself better — as I get older — I don’t have to relate all of my work to my own experience, necessarily. It’s not as important to me to be able to have a total relationship with the character I’m playing. I’m more interested in why people are the way they are and how they do things — how they communicate their experience. In my mind, if I can stretch my reach that far, I can work backwards from there. And then maybe have a greater understanding of my work. (via Vulture)

It’s interesting, watching Lucy I was reminded of Her and Under the Skin. Though in very different ways, in all three, you play a character with a great desire and capacity for learning. Would you say there’s something you’re drawn to about that?

SCARLETT JOHANSSON: All three of those projects — Lucy, Her, and Under the Skin — have allowed me to explore and work from a very expansive place. I don’t have the same boundaries as most dramatic work. The rules don’t necessarily apply to these characters because they’re not even human. That has allowed me to step back and really examine human behavior in a way. As I know myself better — as I get older — I don’t have to relate all of my work to my own experience, necessarily. It’s not as important to me to be able to have a total relationship with the character I’m playing. I’m more interested in why people are the way they are and how they do things — how they communicate their experience. In my mind, if I can stretch my reach that far, I can work backwards from there. And then maybe have a greater understanding of my work. (via Vulture)

11:40
Lucy (Luc Besson, 2014)

Lucy (Luc Besson, 2014)

July 30th
18:20
Did you set out to make a comedy first and foremost, or were the film’s darker elements in place from the start?
Alice Lowe: We wanted to take the stereotype of British tourism, which has this extremely polite veneer, and do something that confounded that. But we didn’t want to make a light, Carry On-style murder comedy – we wanted it to have some psychological veracity, and to challenge people. We knew the characters had to have realistic psychologies for you to be willing to go with them on their journey. The whole movie is essentially about two damaged people coming together, triggering something in one another and becoming more than the sum of their parts.
Did you look to any real serial killers for inspiration when developing the characters?
Steve Oram: We did loads of research, and found out stuff like the fact that Fred West did DIY for his neighbours. People liked him on the street, which is astonishing when you think of what he did. But one of the recurring traits in serial killers is that they’re basically really into themselves. They’re very “me” people! They think they’re playing God, but they’re just making up the rules as they go along. Chris has his own morality, but it’s total bullshit.
AL: Tina is actually much more creative as a killer, she genuinely wants chaos. That totally fucks with Chris’s world view, but also adds an element of excitement. He decides he would rather have a partner in crime that loves him, than be alone.

Did you set out to make a comedy first and foremost, or were the film’s darker elements in place from the start?

Alice Lowe: We wanted to take the stereotype of British tourism, which has this extremely polite veneer, and do something that confounded that. But we didn’t want to make a light, Carry On-style murder comedy – we wanted it to have some psychological veracity, and to challenge people. We knew the characters had to have realistic psychologies for you to be willing to go with them on their journey. The whole movie is essentially about two damaged people coming together, triggering something in one another and becoming more than the sum of their parts.

Did you look to any real serial killers for inspiration when developing the characters?

Steve Oram: We did loads of research, and found out stuff like the fact that Fred West did DIY for his neighbours. People liked him on the street, which is astonishing when you think of what he did. But one of the recurring traits in serial killers is that they’re basically really into themselves. They’re very “me” people! They think they’re playing God, but they’re just making up the rules as they go along. Chris has his own morality, but it’s total bullshit.

AL: Tina is actually much more creative as a killer, she genuinely wants chaos. That totally fucks with Chris’s world view, but also adds an element of excitement. He decides he would rather have a partner in crime that loves him, than be alone.

16:40
Via
15:00
Via
13:20
Sightseers (Ben Wheatley, 2013)

Sightseers (Ben Wheatley, 2013)

12:03

Interstellar trailer (incidentally…Happy Birthday, Christopher Nolan)