elaine, 27, film student always, and the last to leave the theatre.

Photobucket

April 19th
23:44
Via

Sebastian Stan photographed by Nigel Perry

April 18th
15:30
Under the Skin (Jonathan Glazer, 2014)

Under the Skin (Jonathan Glazer, 2014)

April 17th
18:30

Happy Birthday, Edgar Wright.

April 15th
21:30
Via
"

"Time Zones" could well be one of those "Mad Men" episodes that drives people to complain that nothing happens, but I actually think that the viewers who regularly lobbed that complaint at this drama are gone by now.

We’re down to the core fans now, those who accept that what “happens” on this show has a particular flavor, mood and style. Those “happenings” can consist of a significant look, a weighted silence or a crushing realization. Things often “happen” when the camera is focused on the back of a character’s head. This is a show that loves ambiguities, digressions and oblique angles. Not many shows could pull that off, but “Mad Men” has the kind of cast that makes watching people think and react a real pleasure most of the time.

"
—  Maureen Ryan (via flushwithcash)

"I realised after two weeks of hanging out with Nick, I really, really like this guy. It was like a romance blossomed between us."  - Simon Pegg [X]

One day we were shooting “Portlandia” downtown and we went to eat in the lunchroom of this church where they were having an art show. This season’s shoot was really hard; I felt very pushed and challenged, and I was tired and disoriented a lot. I remember sitting down and seeing this painting on a canvas. It said: “If you can, please wake up.” It’s this weird, dark, intense phrase that almost sounded like something like a kid would say to his parents. And that became my mantra for the whole rest of the shoot.
I spent two weeks chasing down the artist— he was the security guard at the building. I told him how much that painting meant to me and how it had really gotten me through the shoot and he said, “I would be happy to sell it to you if it means that much to you.” So about a month ago, I drove over to his house and bought the painting from him.


Carrie Brownstein
Photographs © We Are The Rhoads
April 14th
15:30
Via
filmghoul:

Captain America: The Winter Soldier (Anthony & Joe Russo, 2014)
I wrote about the new Captain America film for the francophone film website Panorama-cinéma. In a nutshell: hands down Marvel’s best film so far, and in keeping with Ed Brubaker’s source material, the film proves smartly indebted to the 70s political thriller. Furthermore, it finally dares bring some monumental changes to the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s status quo, which proves highly satisfying following a bunch of hermetic and uneven sequels to the Thor and Iron Man franchises. It also successfully reframes Steve Rogers as a hero of the present, sabotaging his inherent New Deal idealism through a quotation of post-Watergate paranoia (and it’s cinematic mirrors), which in turn comments on today: S.H.I.E.L.D. acts as a substitute for the America of drone warfare and NSA data-mining and, in a turn of events of unexpected cathartic potential, is brought down. Of course, it’s not as subversive as I make it sound and most of this is felt in the sinuous and propulsive plot.
Conversely, the film’s aesthetic proves as mechanical and uninspired as one could expect from this kind of hasty and “safe” tent pole studio film. In keeping with most of Marvel Studios’ so-called “Phase 2”, it is a haphazardly made producer’s vision, assembled by sitcom television directors , with little or no interest in the staging or interesting cutting of action. More frustratingly, the Russo brothers also have no interest in replicating the stylings of the various films screenwriters Christopher Markus & Stephen McFeely have so much fun quoting (think 3 Days of  the Condor or All The President’s Men, for example). Considering The Winter Soldier is a film that mostly takes place in (and occasionally comments on) the greyish, drab world of corporate America and its surrounding non-places (malls, airplane carriers, submarines, offices, hospitals, highways), this bland “TV aesthetic” is occasionally fitting, but the film suffers where it matters most: some action sequences prove muddy and spatially confusing in key places, and perhaps one could also look to blame stunt coordinator and second unit director Spiro Razatos, who has handled many similar-looking films, more recently Fast and Furious 6 and Total Recall. 
Such is the game in Hollywood, though, and this is far from unwatchable: my only complaint is that it is a bit mechanical, and as a fan, I can only hope for a sharply stylized Captain America that’s more like The Conversation and less like every film in theaters right now. I kept thinking they should give the sequels to either John Hyams or Anton Corbijn, but we’ll have to wait for James Gunn’s Guardians and Edgar Wright’s Ant-Man to see if auteurist iconoclasm can even pierce through Marvel/Disney’s thick shield of uniform and accessible blockbuster filmmaking ethos. As a fanboy, the inclusion of Falcon, Batroc, allusions to Sharon Stone and Stephen Strange, as well as the implications of the film’s ending, have me more excited for Cap 3 than for Avengers: Age of Ultron, and I’m glad and surprised I got as much juice out of this one. I guess it also means I’ll pick up Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. where I left it. Anyhow, if you read French, you should click through to read more or less what I’ve hastily recapped (and, lucky you, revised) over here. You’ll also get a brief discussion of the film’s urban guerrilla aesthetic and how it brings back its violence to the more human level of chases and knife fights, getting away from the allegorical spaceships crashing into anonymous buildings.

filmghoul:

Captain America: The Winter Soldier (Anthony & Joe Russo, 2014)

I wrote about the new Captain America film for the francophone film website Panorama-cinéma. In a nutshell: hands down Marvel’s best film so far, and in keeping with Ed Brubaker’s source material, the film proves smartly indebted to the 70s political thriller. Furthermore, it finally dares bring some monumental changes to the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s status quo, which proves highly satisfying following a bunch of hermetic and uneven sequels to the Thor and Iron Man franchises. It also successfully reframes Steve Rogers as a hero of the present, sabotaging his inherent New Deal idealism through a quotation of post-Watergate paranoia (and it’s cinematic mirrors), which in turn comments on today: S.H.I.E.L.D. acts as a substitute for the America of drone warfare and NSA data-mining and, in a turn of events of unexpected cathartic potential, is brought down. Of course, it’s not as subversive as I make it sound and most of this is felt in the sinuous and propulsive plot.

Conversely, the film’s aesthetic proves as mechanical and uninspired as one could expect from this kind of hasty and “safe” tent pole studio film. In keeping with most of Marvel Studios’ so-called “Phase 2”, it is a haphazardly made producer’s vision, assembled by sitcom television directors , with little or no interest in the staging or interesting cutting of action. More frustratingly, the Russo brothers also have no interest in replicating the stylings of the various films screenwriters Christopher Markus & Stephen McFeely have so much fun quoting (think 3 Days of  the Condor or All The President’s Men, for example). Considering The Winter Soldier is a film that mostly takes place in (and occasionally comments on) the greyish, drab world of corporate America and its surrounding non-places (malls, airplane carriers, submarines, offices, hospitals, highways), this bland “TV aesthetic” is occasionally fitting, but the film suffers where it matters most: some action sequences prove muddy and spatially confusing in key places, and perhaps one could also look to blame stunt coordinator and second unit director Spiro Razatos, who has handled many similar-looking films, more recently Fast and Furious 6 and Total Recall.

Such is the game in Hollywood, though, and this is far from unwatchable: my only complaint is that it is a bit mechanical, and as a fan, I can only hope for a sharply stylized Captain America that’s more like The Conversation and less like every film in theaters right now. I kept thinking they should give the sequels to either John Hyams or Anton Corbijn, but we’ll have to wait for James Gunn’s Guardians and Edgar Wright’s Ant-Man to see if auteurist iconoclasm can even pierce through Marvel/Disney’s thick shield of uniform and accessible blockbuster filmmaking ethos. As a fanboy, the inclusion of Falcon, Batroc, allusions to Sharon Stone and Stephen Strange, as well as the implications of the film’s ending, have me more excited for Cap 3 than for Avengers: Age of Ultron, and I’m glad and surprised I got as much juice out of this one. I guess it also means I’ll pick up Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. where I left it. Anyhow, if you read French, you should click through to read more or less what I’ve hastily recapped (and, lucky you, revised) over here. You’ll also get a brief discussion of the film’s urban guerrilla aesthetic and how it brings back its violence to the more human level of chases and knife fights, getting away from the allegorical spaceships crashing into anonymous buildings.

April 11th
15:30
Via

Empire Magazine discusses the gay subtext of 'Captain America: The Winter Solider."

  • Chris Hewitt: Another core relationship in the film is Captain America and the Falcon.
  • Helen O'Hara: Do you know what, I may have said this in the main podcast but honestly every beat of their relationship is exactly like a romance. Seriously. They got to ‘meet cute’ running along, then they bond over some spurious shared history, and then it’s all like ‘Oh I’m in real trouble & I just turned up at your door because you’re the one person I could think to go to for help”. And he’s all like “Sure use my shower.” I mean, come on people! And I think it works well using that kind of shorthand to create a kind of a friendship quite quickly. But honestly they are the ‘couple’ in the film.
  • Chris: It’s interesting though, he spends the entire movie turning down exhortations from Natasha to ask women out, the ENTIRE movie.
  • Helen: Hey it would be a great political statement if Captain America’s gay.
  • Chris: “What about such-and-such from statistics?” “No, I’m not interested.” “What about such-and-such? What about your next door neighbour who’s really really hot?”
  • Ali Plumb: “What about this one-armed cyborg man who you have history with..?”
  • Chris: “…with the dreamy eyes and long hair.”
  • Helen: He was looking dreamy it has to be said.
  • http: //www.empireonline.com/news/story.asp?NID=40685
"

While Johansson’s first Marvel appearance in Iron Man 2 may have relied somewhat upon sex appeal, this was quickly nixed in favor of characterizing her as the most cerebral Avenger. Her most important scenes in The Avengers relied upon her intelligence and skills as a spy, to the extent that she even managed to outwit Loki, the God of Lies. At the end of the movie, she’s the one who closes the portal that let all the aliens into New York. Then in Winter Soldier she’s given second billing to Captain America, a meaty role that showcases a wide-ranging skillset that stretches far beyond just “kicking ass.” At no point during any of these movies does she seduce anyone, by the way.

Sadly, there’s very little sign of this character in the most easily accessible reviews of both The Avengers and Winter Soldier. Judging by the Guardian, WSJ, or New Yorker, Black Widow is more like a blow-up doll with a black belt. By their logic, if she’s wearing a tight outfit, then she must be a sexy ass-kicker, meaning that she must be the token female character, and therefore is little more than eye candy.

With that thought process in mind, it must make perfect sense to relegate Black Widow to a single sniggering comment about her catsuit, because obviously Scarlett Johansson is just there for decoration. And if you’ve read in the New York Times that Black Widow is a token female character, then chances are you’ll have internalized that opinion before you even buy a ticket. The feedback loop of misogynist preconceptions continues on, and in the end, we all lose out.

"
April 9th
09:18
Via
April 8th
09:48
Captain America: The Winter Soldier (Anthony Russo & Joe Russo, 2014)

Captain America: The Winter Soldier (Anthony Russo & Joe Russo, 2014)

April 7th
13:16
Via