elaine, 28, film student always, and the last to leave the theatre.

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May 27th
16:16
Via

ladistruzionedelcielo:

The best things in life are free

May 20th
15:00
Via

Come on.

“Some will look at Peggy and Don’s dance and see it as a clear sign of romance to come; others, like me, will view it more like a father-daughter waltz at a wedding. Whatever happens in the show’s remaining eight episodes, neither interpretation is wrong. Don and Peggy’s relationship has always defied easy categorization, and it always will — intimate without being sexual, they are confidantes as well as adversaries, dear friends who know each other on very limited terms. To paraphrase Pete Campbell, theirs is a very vaguely defined sort of family.” —L.A. Times

“If you were to ask us what our favorite scene in the entire run of Mad Men was, we wouldn’t hesitate to name this one, from season two, where Don walks Peggy right up to a killer Mohawk Airline tag  (‘What did you bring me, Daddy?’) by connecting with her on a deep and intense level and coaxing greatness out of her. It’s a scene that perfectly defines their relationship and the relationship the show has with advertising; the ways the writers use it to illuminate themes and comment on important personal and familial relationships. Well, they finally managed to top themselves – and how utterly, perfectly poetic that this time, Don and Peggy weren’t connecting over the perfect way to sell airlines to businessmen fathers, they were doing it over the question of how to sell hamburgers to overworked mothers. Instead of Don at the top of his game teaching an eager apprentice the ropes, we had Don at the end of his, well… rope, doing his best to placate an angry and bitter Peggy back into greatness. To end the scene with them slowly and sadly dancing to ‘My Way’ made for the absolute best moment in the entire run of the show. Beautifully written, directed and performed.” —Tom and Lorenzo

“Some episodes this season seemed to have been plotted too neatly on graph paper, with characters mirroring each other’s symbolic gestures. This episode, ferociously written by Semi Chellas and thankfully low on Stanley Kubrick references, is less tidily parallel and more gritty, from blond Bonnie’s filthy New York City toes to Bob’s bloody-nosed friend. Like Don and Peggy’s pitch, scene after scene feels hard-won. It was difficult not to think of the series at its best — as in Don and Peggy’s Season 4 episode ‘The Suitcase’ — and to note, as many did on Twitter, that their dance to ‘My Way,’ with all the stubborn, bullheaded intimacy it implied, could have been a lovely series finale.” —New York Times

May 19th
11:40
Via

pggyolson:

What if there was a place, where you could break bread, and anyone who was sitting there was your family?

June 4th
08:30
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April 16th
15:04
Via

Don: “With you or without you, I’m moving on. And I don’t know if I can do it alone. Will you help me?”Peggy: “What if I say no? You’ll never speak to me again.”Don: “No. I will spend the rest of my life trying to hire you.”

Don: “With you or without you, I’m moving on. And I don’t know if I can do it alone. Will you help me?”
Peggy: “What if I say no? You’ll never speak to me again.”
Don: “No. I will spend the rest of my life trying to hire you.”

April 2nd
21:28
Via
February 1st
17:19

Favorite 30 Rock boyfriends: Dean Winters, Jon Hamm and Jason Sudeikis. 

April 6th
22:31
Via
March 5th
08:06
Via
tvhangover:

Jon Hamm and Elisabeth Moss Discuss Mad Men Season 5

Some of the best moments of the series are duets between you two, as in “The Suitcase.” What is it about Don and Peggy?
JH: It’s not a mistake that the show starts on Peggy’s first day at work. In many ways, the story of Mad Men is the story of Peggy Olson: a young, ambitious, talented girl finding  her way in this crazy world. I think Don and Peggy have a special  relationship. They’re unsatisfied with who they are and are willing to  do what it takes to become something else.
EM: People are constantly  asking if they’re gonna sleep together. I always get annoyed, because  their relationship is more than that. And to keep that going over five  years without selling out and having something else happen—that to me is  really interesting and rarely done well.
JH: People want to put us  in a “Sam and Diane” box, but it’s about their mutual appreciation for  the work. That’s where the material strikes its resonant chord, when  it’s ostensibly about one thing and then it becomes about so much more.  That’s the fun thing about Don and Peggy, and that’s the deeper thing  about Mad Men.

tvhangover:

Jon Hamm and Elisabeth Moss Discuss Mad Men Season 5

Some of the best moments of the series are duets between you two, as in “The Suitcase.” What is it about Don and Peggy?

JH: It’s not a mistake that the show starts on Peggy’s first day at work. In many ways, the story of Mad Men is the story of Peggy Olson: a young, ambitious, talented girl finding her way in this crazy world. I think Don and Peggy have a special relationship. They’re unsatisfied with who they are and are willing to do what it takes to become something else.

EM: People are constantly asking if they’re gonna sleep together. I always get annoyed, because their relationship is more than that. And to keep that going over five years without selling out and having something else happen—that to me is really interesting and rarely done well.

JH: People want to put us in a “Sam and Diane” box, but it’s about their mutual appreciation for the work. That’s where the material strikes its resonant chord, when it’s ostensibly about one thing and then it becomes about so much more. That’s the fun thing about Don and Peggy, and that’s the deeper thing about Mad Men.

December 12th
19:12
Via

cryinganddriving:

lucymcclane:

Mad Men, 1x1 Smoke Gets In Your Eyes / 4x7 The Suitcase 

September 7th
21:44
Via
"The problem with sweeping things under the rug is that eventually you run out of rug. It’s not an unlimited resource… Holding her hand at the end of the episode is an incredibly nice callback to the pilot of the show, when Peggy awkwardly tries to make a pass at me by putting her hand on my hand and gets completely rebuffed. Then we see this connection again, 40-whatever episodes later. It’s not a sexual thing; it’s completely a supportive friendly, human gesture."
—  Jon Hamm and Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner offer an oral history of Season 4’s episode ‘The Suitcase’. (via tvhangover)
April 24th
13:01
Via