elaine, 27, film student always, and the last to leave the theatre.

Photobucket

November 4th
09:20
Via
kimbrulee:

letterheady:

Orson Welles, 1941 | Source

I would love to write a fake letter on this right now…

kimbrulee:

letterheady:

Orson Welles, 1941 | Source

I would love to write a fake letter on this right now…

June 30th
12:01
"As a cinematographer, every film that I have worked on is my favorite for one reason or another. But just as important, where else do you meet people like those in this industry? As an example, we spoke earlier about The Lady From Shanghai that was directed by Orson Welles. We spent two months in Acapulco, one month in San Francisco and two months on stages at Columbia Pictures. In Acapulco, we used Errol Flynn’s yacht, and he came along as the skipper. Errol Flynn and Orson Welles were quite a pair. There was never a dull moment. What also kept things lively was the constant bickering between Orson and studio production manager Jack Fier. On the next-to-final day of filming, it appeared that Orson was going to get the last word when he personally painted a huge banner that he hung outside the stage. It read: ‘There Is Nothing To Fear But Fier Himself.’ But, Fier topped him with his own banner the next day, the final day of filming that read: ‘All’s Well That Ends Welles.’"
—  

Richard Kline, ASC, in Kodak’s OnFilm interview series.

Kline’s father and two uncles were cinematographers and before joining the Navy during World War II where he was the ship photographer for the USS Los Angeles, he was a slate boy for Columbia Pictures. Two weeks after being discharged, he got a call from Columbia Pictures to work in Acapulco, Mexico on the film The Lady from Shanghai. 


June 2nd
19:19
Above: John Huston, Orson Welles and Peter Bogdanovich, who worked together on Welles’ 1972 film, “The Other Side of the Wind.”Bogdanovich on film
 
Q: You were great friends with Orson Welles, writing a book with him (“This Is Orson Welles”), and he even lived with you at one point. How did you meet?
Peter Bogdanovich: In 1961, I was asked to curate the first Orson Welles retrospective in North America (in New York). I was asked because I wrote an article calling (his) “Othello” the best Shakespeare movie ever made. We asked him to come - we sent a message by Dictaphone to Europe, where he was making “The Trial.” We didn’t hear anything for seven years.
Then I got a call, and I recognized the voice: “Is Peter Bogdanovich there?” “Speaking.” “This is Orson Welles. I can’t tell you how long I’ve wanted to meet you.” I said, “Hey, that’s my line!” … The next day, I went to meet him at his hotel, and there he was, wearing a large kind of smock or something. We spent three hours together, and at the end of it, I felt I’d known him my whole life.
When he lived with me (in the 1970s), he took over the house. And it was a big house, too. One of my happiest memories is of him moving quickly though my office, saying, “Dick Van Dyke is on!” He loved to watch reruns of “The Dick Van Dyke Show.”
—————-
That Dick Van Dyke bit knocked my socks off.

Above: John Huston, Orson Welles and Peter Bogdanovich, who worked together on Welles’ 1972 film, “The Other Side of the Wind.”
Bogdanovich on film

Q: You were great friends with Orson Welles, writing a book with him (“This Is Orson Welles”), and he even lived with you at one point. How did you meet?

Peter Bogdanovich: In 1961, I was asked to curate the first Orson Welles retrospective in North America (in New York). I was asked because I wrote an article calling (his) “Othello” the best Shakespeare movie ever made. We asked him to come - we sent a message by Dictaphone to Europe, where he was making “The Trial.” We didn’t hear anything for seven years.

Then I got a call, and I recognized the voice: “Is Peter Bogdanovich there?” “Speaking.” “This is Orson Welles. I can’t tell you how long I’ve wanted to meet you.” I said, “Hey, that’s my line!” … The next day, I went to meet him at his hotel, and there he was, wearing a large kind of smock or something. We spent three hours together, and at the end of it, I felt I’d known him my whole life.

When he lived with me (in the 1970s), he took over the house. And it was a big house, too. One of my happiest memories is of him moving quickly though my office, saying, “Dick Van Dyke is on!” He loved to watch reruns of “The Dick Van Dyke Show.”

—————-

That Dick Van Dyke bit knocked my socks off.

January 1st
11:52
Via
kidcasting:

Citizen Kane, 1941
Submitted by John Martz.

kidcasting:

Citizen Kane, 1941

Submitted by John Martz.

November 17th
06:35
Via
byronic:

Orson Welles photographed by Cecil Beaton, 1937

byronic:

Orson Welles photographed by Cecil Beaton, 1937

August 18th
20:11
Michael Shannon as Orson Welles. It would work.

Michael Shannon as Orson Welles. It would work.

July 27th
15:35
Via
kapi:

What’s that? You won the internet?
Well done.

kapi:

What’s that? You won the internet?

Well done.

February 3rd
10:06
Via
oldfilmsflicker:

byronic:
Orson Welles via www.wga.org
rosssssssssssssebud

Michael Shannon should totally play Orson Welles in film. They have a physical likeness. And I think he could pull it off.

oldfilmsflicker:

byronic:

Orson Welles via www.wga.org

rosssssssssssssebud

Michael Shannon should totally play Orson Welles in film. They have a physical likeness. And I think he could pull it off.