elaine, 27, film student always, and the last to leave the theatre.

Photobucket

April 15th
14:09
Via
One day we were shooting “Portlandia” downtown and we went to eat in the lunchroom of this church where they were having an art show. This season’s shoot was really hard; I felt very pushed and challenged, and I was tired and disoriented a lot. I remember sitting down and seeing this painting on a canvas. It said: “If you can, please wake up.” It’s this weird, dark, intense phrase that almost sounded like something like a kid would say to his parents. And that became my mantra for the whole rest of the shoot.
I spent two weeks chasing down the artist— he was the security guard at the building. I told him how much that painting meant to me and how it had really gotten me through the shoot and he said, “I would be happy to sell it to you if it means that much to you.” So about a month ago, I drove over to his house and bought the painting from him.


Carrie Brownstein
Photographs © We Are The Rhoads
March 22nd
22:00
Via

bolto:

[x]

February 4th
14:19

"My original take on this scene was a loud, late night pronouncement from Lester Bangs.  A call to arms.  In Phil’s hands it became something different.  A scene about quiet truths shared between two guys, both at the crossroads, both hurting, and both up too late.  It became the soul of the movie.  In between takes, Hoffman spoke to no one.  He listened only to his headset, only to the words of Lester himself.  (His Walkman was filled with rare Lester interviews.)  When the scene was over, I realized that Hoffman had pulled off a magic trick.  He’d leapt over the words and the script, and gone hunting for the soul and compassion of the private Lester, the one only a few of us had ever met.  Suddenly the portrait was complete.  The crew and I will always be grateful for that front row seat to his genius." - Cameron Crowe - Vulture.

January 31st
11:53
Via
January 29th
19:01
Via

thefilmfatale:

The memorable chest thumping/chanting scene with Matthew McConaughey and Leonardo DiCaprio in Martin Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street was actually based on McConaughey’s own real life pre-filming ritual. McConaughey recalls, in an interview with Rolling Stone:

"That’s one of my rituals that I do before filming. It’s a humming meditation, and when I was in the middle of it, Leo interrupted and said, ‘What is that you’re doing?’ I told him I was just preparing for the scene and immediately he was like, ‘You have to do that in the scene!’ So I said all right. Little did I know that when I saw the final cut and it actually became the baseline for our story" (x).
January 21st
14:08
Via
nprfreshair:

In today’s interview with Joaquin Phoenix we ask him about why his character in the film The Master speaks out of the side of his mouth: 

My dad sometimes would talk out of the side; he’d clench down one side of his mouth. And I just thought it represented tension in this way, somebody that’s just blocked and tight.
So I actually went to my dentist and I had them fasten these metal brackets to my teeth on the top and the bottom and then I wrapped rubber bands around it to force my jaw shut on one side. … After a couple weeks, the bands, they weren’t really strong enough to kind of hold it so I ended up getting rid of the rubber bands and I still had these metal brackets in and so it made me constantly aware of my cheek. You know, they had these pointy tips so they’d tear up the cheek a little bit, so I just then was constantly aware of it.
This is so f - - - - - - stupid. Why am I talking about this? … It’s not interesting, it’s so stupid. If I was driving and I heard this, I’d change the channel. … I’d be like, “Joaquin, shut up.”



image via interview magazine

nprfreshair:

In today’s interview with Joaquin Phoenix we ask him about why his character in the film The Master speaks out of the side of his mouth: 

My dad sometimes would talk out of the side; he’d clench down one side of his mouth. And I just thought it represented tension in this way, somebody that’s just blocked and tight.

So I actually went to my dentist and I had them fasten these metal brackets to my teeth on the top and the bottom and then I wrapped rubber bands around it to force my jaw shut on one side. … After a couple weeks, the bands, they weren’t really strong enough to kind of hold it so I ended up getting rid of the rubber bands and I still had these metal brackets in and so it made me constantly aware of my cheek. You know, they had these pointy tips so they’d tear up the cheek a little bit, so I just then was constantly aware of it.

This is so f - - - - - - stupid. Why am I talking about this? … It’s not interesting, it’s so stupid. If I was driving and I heard this, I’d change the channel. … I’d be like, “Joaquin, shut up.”

image via interview magazine

January 15th
19:53
Via
“You know, there’s all these guys in shorts with mag lights and walkie talkies and stuff walking around. And here comes Katherine (Cate’s dance double) and she walks up in identical wardrobe as Cate. And she starts dancing. Just the sound of people’s chins hitting the floor was like, ‘Thud-thud-thud-thud-thud’. You would think a scene that takes place in the dark with a woman dancing for a man in a gazebo would be, ‘Yeah yeah, let’s get this done’. But the grips were like, ‘Maybe you should do one more.’ ‘I don’t know Dave, is that your best work’?” - David Fincher, Benjamin Button commentary
December 25th
14:00
Via
"What the roomful of executives saw upon the first screening was a shock—a slow and quiet semireligious, jazz-filled 25 minutes, voiced by a cast of inexperienced children, and, perhaps most unforgivably, without a laugh track. “They said, ‘We’ll play it once and that will be all. Good try,’ ” remembers Mendelson. “Bill and I thought we had ruined Charlie Brown forever when it was done. We kind of agreed with the network. One of the animators stood up in the back of the room—he had had a couple of drinks—and he said, ‘It’s going to run for a hundred years,’ and then fell down. We all thought he was crazy, but he was more right than we were.”"
December 7th
10:00
"It was a church service on Christmas Eve…We were singing "Silent Night" and lighting candles at the same time, but my dad had a really bad wick. His wick wasn’t planted into the wax so he couldn’t get his candle lit. Everybody, 500 hundred people in the church, had their candle lit. They’re singing "Silent Night." My dad’s oblivious, I’m trying to light his candle, and I’m, "Dad, we’re on the third stanza here, get this thing lit." It was three minutes of him trying to get this embedded waxed wick lit. And so the song’s ending, he finally gets it lit. He brings it to the front of his face, and as soon as he brings it to the front of his face, everybody blows out their candle. It was the greatest timing thing I’ve ever witnessed. And I know it doesn’t seem that great when you listen to that, but I had this feeling in my gut that I have never laughed..I screamed in church! I went, "HAAAH!" And I had to leave. I’m laughing at my father, which he’s not too crazy about, it’s in church, it’s underneath "Silent Night" going on…Boy was that beautiful. The timing of it was perfect. Gorgeous. Gorgeous." - Zach Galifianakis, on the hardest laugh he ever had.

"It was a church service on Christmas Eve…We were singing "Silent Night" and lighting candles at the same time, but my dad had a really bad wick. His wick wasn’t planted into the wax so he couldn’t get his candle lit. Everybody, 500 hundred people in the church, had their candle lit. They’re singing "Silent Night." My dad’s oblivious, I’m trying to light his candle, and I’m, "Dad, we’re on the third stanza here, get this thing lit." It was three minutes of him trying to get this embedded waxed wick lit. And so the song’s ending, he finally gets it lit. He brings it to the front of his face, and as soon as he brings it to the front of his face, everybody blows out their candle. It was the greatest timing thing I’ve ever witnessed. And I know it doesn’t seem that great when you listen to that, but I had this feeling in my gut that I have never laughed..I screamed in church! I went, "HAAAH!" And I had to leave. I’m laughing at my father, which he’s not too crazy about, it’s in church, it’s underneath "Silent Night" going on…Boy was that beautiful. The timing of it was perfect. Gorgeous. Gorgeous." - Zach Galifianakis, on the hardest laugh he ever had.

December 6th
18:00
Via
oldloves:

Bill Murray on Gilda Radner:
"Gilda got married and went away. None of us saw her anymore. There was one good thing: Laraine had a party one night, a great party at her house. And I ended up being the disk jockey. She just had forty-fives, and not that many, so you really had to work the music end of it. There was a collection of like the funniest people in the world at this party. Somehow Sam Kinison sticks in my brain. The whole Monty Python group was there, most of us from the show, a lot of other funny people, and Gilda. Gilda showed up and she’d already had cancer and gone into remission and then had it again, I guess. Anyway she was slim. We hadn’t seen her in a long time. And she started doing, “I’ve got to go,” and she was just going to leave, and I was like, “Going to leave?” It felt like she was going to really leave forever.So we started carrying her around, in a way that we could only do with her. We carried her up and down the stairs, around the house, repeatedly, for a long time, until I was exhausted. Then Danny did it for a while. Then I did it again. We just kept carrying her; we did it in teams. We kept carrying her around, but like upside down, every which way—over your shoulder and under your arm, carrying her like luggage. And that went on for more than an hour—maybe an hour and a half—just carrying her around and saying, “She’s leaving! This could be it! Now come on, this could be the last time we see her. Gilda’s leaving, and remember that she was very sick—hello?”We worked all aspects of it, but it started with just, “She’s leaving, I don’t know if you’ve said good-bye to her.” And we said good-bye to the same people ten, twenty times, you know. And because these people were really funny, every person we’d drag her up to would just do like five minutes on her, with Gilda upside down in this sort of tortured position, which she absolutely loved. She was laughing so hard we could have lost her right then and there.It was just one of the best parties I’ve ever been to in my life. I’ll always remember it. It was the last time I saw her.”
- from Live from New York: an Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live

oldloves:

Bill Murray on Gilda Radner:

"Gilda got married and went away. None of us saw her anymore. There was one good thing: Laraine had a party one night, a great party at her house. And I ended up being the disk jockey. She just had forty-fives, and not that many, so you really had to work the music end of it. There was a collection of like the funniest people in the world at this party. Somehow Sam Kinison sticks in my brain. The whole Monty Python group was there, most of us from the show, a lot of other funny people, and Gilda. Gilda showed up and she’d already had cancer and gone into remission and then had it again, I guess. Anyway she was slim. We hadn’t seen her in a long time. And she started doing, “I’ve got to go,” and she was just going to leave, and I was like, “Going to leave?” It felt like she was going to really leave forever.

So we started carrying her around, in a way that we could only do with her. We carried her up and down the stairs, around the house, repeatedly, for a long time, until I was exhausted. Then Danny did it for a while. Then I did it again. We just kept carrying her; we did it in teams. We kept carrying her around, but like upside down, every which way—over your shoulder and under your arm, carrying her like luggage. And that went on for more than an hour—maybe an hour and a half—just carrying her around and saying, “She’s leaving! This could be it! Now come on, this could be the last time we see her. Gilda’s leaving, and remember that she was very sick—hello?”

We worked all aspects of it, but it started with just, “She’s leaving, I don’t know if you’ve said good-bye to her.” And we said good-bye to the same people ten, twenty times, you know. 

And because these people were really funny, every person we’d drag her up to would just do like five minutes on her, with Gilda upside down in this sort of tortured position, which she absolutely loved. She was laughing so hard we could have lost her right then and there.

It was just one of the best parties I’ve ever been to in my life. I’ll always remember it. It was the last time I saw her.”

- from Live from New York: an Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live

December 1st
13:15
"I had one girl who I found inside my beach house in California one time. That was a little freaky. She couldn’t put anything into words and she had tears streaming down her face. So I embraced her, took her outside and sat her down, talked to her about why she came to my house and she just said: "I’m sorry, I just felt we needed to meet one another". I asked her whether this was what she needed or whether she felt she’d need more in the future and, when she said no, I gave her a hug and walked her to her car. She drove off and I haven’t seen her again." - Paul Walker

"I had one girl who I found inside my beach house in California one time. That was a little freaky. She couldn’t put anything into words and she had tears streaming down her face. So I embraced her, took her outside and sat her down, talked to her about why she came to my house and she just said: "I’m sorry, I just felt we needed to meet one another". I asked her whether this was what she needed or whether she felt she’d need more in the future and, when she said no, I gave her a hug and walked her to her car. She drove off and I haven’t seen her again." - Paul Walker

November 27th
22:20
I’m not a Dr. Who fan (as I haven’t seen any of it), but I am a fan of television that delights, entertains, and comforts children of all ages. 

I’m not a Dr. Who fan (as I haven’t seen any of it), but I am a fan of television that delights, entertains, and comforts children of all ages.