elaine, 28, film student always, and the last to leave the theatre.

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July 31st
16:18
Via
July 29th
15:00
"In South Korea, there is a train called the cinema train. It’s not the whole train, but one section, they show the movie inside the train from Seoul to Paju. The funny thing is, I was in the cinema train and I saw the movie “The Perks of Being a Wallflower.” And in the beginning of the movie, there’s a subtitle [that said] “This movie has been re-edited for the train’s duration.” So, for the length of the train ride, they cut it down. They should have just found a shorter movie. I was really pissed off. [laughs]” - Bong Joon-Ho.

"In South Korea, there is a train called the cinema train. It’s not the whole train, but one section, they show the movie inside the train from Seoul to Paju. The funny thing is, I was in the cinema train and I saw the movie “The Perks of Being a Wallflower.” And in the beginning of the movie, there’s a subtitle [that said] “This movie has been re-edited for the train’s duration.” So, for the length of the train ride, they cut it down. They should have just found a shorter movie. I was really pissed off. [laughs]” - Bong Joon-Ho.

July 17th
16:40
Via
"But it would have been impossible to cut Chris Evans’s hands off. I mean, he’s a hundred percent muscle and I’m a hundred percent fat, even though we’re both men… You just have to admire him when he wears that form fitting spandex in Captain America.

Actually, it was really hard to hide his muscles, to make him look like he had been in the back of the train for 17 years, and we had to hide him under costumes. Inside the coat, we had to take out the lining and remove the sleeves of the sweater so his muscles looked like the bulk of the sweater. So he was just wearing a vest under that coat the entire movie. It was just his naked arms inside that coat."
—  Snowpiercer director Bong Joon-Ho [x] (via fiveyearmission)
June 15th
11:40
Via

Tiscali: It’s worth noting that many of the cast come from famous or dysfunctional families, a bit like the Tenenbaums.
Wes Anderson: It’s interesting. You know, Ben Stiller, Gwyneth Paltrow, certainly Anjelica Huston, all those families are real achievers, you know, and fame is an issue for their whole families. For Anjelica Huston (daughter of John Huston) I think there’s definitely things for her to relate to in terms of the character that Hackman is playing. Hackman - I didn’t know much of anything about his background, but after we’d finished the movie I saw an episode of Inside The Actors Studio which he did while we were filming. And he talked about his father, and it seemed to really relate to what he’d been playing in the movie - it caught me so much off-guard. You know, there was no dialogue between us about it, but it was clearly something he couldn’t have helped but to tap into.
Tiscali: What did he say in the programme?
Wes Anderson: His father left his family when he was 13 or so, and he just described this moment when Hackman and his friends were playing in the street, and his father drove by. And Hackman saw him driving by, and his father kind of waved from the window but didn’t stop the car. And it was the last he saw him for ten years. And Hackman had really choked up when he was telling it. It was very moving. I’d never heard anything about this at all. And he’d been playing this father who abandons his family for years and years. (via)

Tiscali: It’s worth noting that many of the cast come from famous or dysfunctional families, a bit like the Tenenbaums.

Wes Anderson: It’s interesting. You know, Ben Stiller, Gwyneth Paltrow, certainly Anjelica Huston, all those families are real achievers, you know, and fame is an issue for their whole families. For Anjelica Huston (daughter of John Huston) I think there’s definitely things for her to relate to in terms of the character that Hackman is playing. Hackman - I didn’t know much of anything about his background, but after we’d finished the movie I saw an episode of Inside The Actors Studio which he did while we were filming. And he talked about his father, and it seemed to really relate to what he’d been playing in the movie - it caught me so much off-guard. You know, there was no dialogue between us about it, but it was clearly something he couldn’t have helped but to tap into.

Tiscali: What did he say in the programme?

Wes Anderson: His father left his family when he was 13 or so, and he just described this moment when Hackman and his friends were playing in the street, and his father drove by. And Hackman saw him driving by, and his father kind of waved from the window but didn’t stop the car. And it was the last he saw him for ten years. And Hackman had really choked up when he was telling it. It was very moving. I’d never heard anything about this at all. And he’d been playing this father who abandons his family for years and years. (via)

May 27th
13:20
"Matthew Weiner came to me and said, “Bobby, I want to talk to you… You’re going to pass away in this episode. I’m sorry.” I said, “I perfectly understand.” And he said, “By the way, I’ve always wanted to have you sing. That’s what I remember you from, all your Broadway and theater days. When I hired you, always, in the back of my mind, I wanted you to sing a song, but there was never a place to do it.” And then he came up with this idea. He said, “I am going to make you come back in the last shot in the picture and sing a song to Don.” [Morse sings] “The moon belongs to everyone. The best things in life are free.” They had this wonderful choreographer, Mary Ann Kellogg, whom I knew very well, and hired four or five beautiful dancers who would play secretaries… I dance with them and also sing to Don, and it’s a whole production. I went and learned the song, and I went into the studio and we recorded it with a huge orchestra. Then we rehearsed it on the set for a couple of days, away from everybody else. Nobody knew what was going on… It was just a lovely way, a sweet way, for dear Matt to send me off.” - Robert Morse.

"Matthew Weiner came to me and said, “Bobby, I want to talk to you… You’re going to pass away in this episode. I’m sorry.” I said, “I perfectly understand.” And he said, “By the way, I’ve always wanted to have you sing. That’s what I remember you from, all your Broadway and theater days. When I hired you, always, in the back of my mind, I wanted you to sing a song, but there was never a place to do it.” And then he came up with this idea. He said, “I am going to make you come back in the last shot in the picture and sing a song to Don.” [Morse sings] “The moon belongs to everyone. The best things in life are free.” They had this wonderful choreographer, Mary Ann Kellogg, whom I knew very well, and hired four or five beautiful dancers who would play secretaries… I dance with them and also sing to Don, and it’s a whole production. I went and learned the song, and I went into the studio and we recorded it with a huge orchestra. Then we rehearsed it on the set for a couple of days, away from everybody else. Nobody knew what was going on… It was just a lovely way, a sweet way, for dear Matt to send me off.” - Robert Morse.

May 19th
13:20

“There weren’t a lot of contemporary mechanics introduced, like helicopters and zoom lenses. It was a tableau form of moviemaking, where the actors move in and out of frame, very straightforward. It was supposed to feel like a period piece… There was no discussion of lighting. I just did what I felt like doing. The design came out of the juxtaposition of the bright, cheerful garden party wedding that was going on outside, and the underbelly in this dark house. I used overhead lighting because the Don was the personification of evil, and I didn’t always want the audience to look into his eyes, see what he was thinking. I just wanted to keep him dark… (In those days) screens were so blitzed with light that you could see into every corner of every toilet and closet on the set. I’d always hear, ‘They have to be able to see it in the drive-ins….’ When the dark stuff started to appear on the screen, it seemed a little scary to people who were used to looking at Doris Day movies.” - DP Gordon Willis talking about The Godfather in Peter Biskind’s book Easy Riders, Raging Bulls. Willis died yesterday at the age of 92.

May 4th
13:40
Via
mattybing1025:


In her first and only meeting with the famous macho actor Marlon Brando, early in her career at Paramount, the two were seated next to each other at an Actor’s Guild luncheon. As they sat down, Audrey said a shy hello. Brando said not a single word to her during the entire dinner. For 40 years, Ferrer says, his mother believed that Brando had shunned her. But in the hospital near the end of her life, she received a letter from the famous actor. A mutual friend must have told him of Hepburn’s feelings, and he wrote to set the record straight. Although she might have been shy of him at that luncheon, he recalled that he had been so much in awe of her that he was speechless. He couldn’t think of a single thing to say.

—Excerpt from Audrey Hepburn:  A Son’s Reflections

mattybing1025:

In her first and only meeting with the famous macho actor Marlon Brando, early in her career at Paramount, the two were seated next to each other at an Actor’s Guild luncheon. As they sat down, Audrey said a shy hello. Brando said not a single word to her during the entire dinner. For 40 years, Ferrer says, his mother believed that Brando had shunned her. But in the hospital near the end of her life, she received a letter from the famous actor. A mutual friend must have told him of Hepburn’s feelings, and he wrote to set the record straight. Although she might have been shy of him at that luncheon, he recalled that he had been so much in awe of her that he was speechless. He couldn’t think of a single thing to say.

—Excerpt from Audrey Hepburn:  A Son’s Reflections

April 15th
14:09
Via
One day we were shooting “Portlandia” downtown and we went to eat in the lunchroom of this church where they were having an art show. This season’s shoot was really hard; I felt very pushed and challenged, and I was tired and disoriented a lot. I remember sitting down and seeing this painting on a canvas. It said: “If you can, please wake up.” It’s this weird, dark, intense phrase that almost sounded like something like a kid would say to his parents. And that became my mantra for the whole rest of the shoot.
I spent two weeks chasing down the artist— he was the security guard at the building. I told him how much that painting meant to me and how it had really gotten me through the shoot and he said, “I would be happy to sell it to you if it means that much to you.” So about a month ago, I drove over to his house and bought the painting from him.


Carrie Brownstein
Photographs © We Are The Rhoads
March 22nd
22:00
Via

bolto:

[x]

February 4th
14:19

"My original take on this scene was a loud, late night pronouncement from Lester Bangs.  A call to arms.  In Phil’s hands it became something different.  A scene about quiet truths shared between two guys, both at the crossroads, both hurting, and both up too late.  It became the soul of the movie.  In between takes, Hoffman spoke to no one.  He listened only to his headset, only to the words of Lester himself.  (His Walkman was filled with rare Lester interviews.)  When the scene was over, I realized that Hoffman had pulled off a magic trick.  He’d leapt over the words and the script, and gone hunting for the soul and compassion of the private Lester, the one only a few of us had ever met.  Suddenly the portrait was complete.  The crew and I will always be grateful for that front row seat to his genius." - Cameron Crowe - Vulture.

January 31st
11:53
Via
January 29th
19:01
Via

thefilmfatale:

The memorable chest thumping/chanting scene with Matthew McConaughey and Leonardo DiCaprio in Martin Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street was actually based on McConaughey’s own real life pre-filming ritual. McConaughey recalls, in an interview with Rolling Stone:

"That’s one of my rituals that I do before filming. It’s a humming meditation, and when I was in the middle of it, Leo interrupted and said, ‘What is that you’re doing?’ I told him I was just preparing for the scene and immediately he was like, ‘You have to do that in the scene!’ So I said all right. Little did I know that when I saw the final cut and it actually became the baseline for our story" (x).