elaine, 28, film student always, and the last to leave the theatre.

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September 21st
09:46
Via

Sundays.



One other thing Murray won’t do: He won’t say what he whispered to Scarlett Johansson at the end of Lost in Translation.
“I guess the answer is, there’s somethin’ that makes it impossible to tell,” he says. “But I’ll tell ya a good story about it. I’m gettin’ on the ferry at Martha’s Vineyard, and some guy yells out from across the way, ‘Bill, what’d ya say to her?’ Everyone hears him ask, and I pause for a second with my mouth open and start to speak. And as I start to speak, the foghorn sounds, about a twenty-five-second blast, and I just”—Murray starts moving his lips silently—“I acted it out like I was saying something really sincere, and the crowd laughed so hard. It was great. I couldn’t have bought that moment.” 
—  The Master: Bill Murray. Bill Murray is 64 today.

Sundays.

One other thing Murray won’t do: He won’t say what he whispered to Scarlett Johansson at the end of Lost in Translation.

“I guess the answer is, there’s somethin’ that makes it impossible to tell,” he says. “But I’ll tell ya a good story about it. I’m gettin’ on the ferry at Martha’s Vineyard, and some guy yells out from across the way, ‘Bill, what’d ya say to her?’ Everyone hears him ask, and I pause for a second with my mouth open and start to speak. And as I start to speak, the foghorn sounds, about a twenty-five-second blast, and I just”—Murray starts moving his lips silently—“I acted it out like I was saying something really sincere, and the crowd laughed so hard. It was great. I couldn’t have bought that moment.” 

—  The Master: Bill Murray. Bill Murray is 64 today.

August 13th
15:00
Via

Cary Grant photographed at Hearst Castle. 
"The movie people were always there. My favorite was Cary Grant. He stopped in on a couple of occasions to visit at the gatehouse with us. We’d talk about the movies, life-everything. He was great fun," said Wilfred Lyons. 
Sometimes, apparently, too much fun; one day Grant nearly got himself kicked off the property permanently when he and Will Jr. took a small plane up above the estate and, as a prank, bombarded the hanger’s roof with sacks of flour. When they returned, Grant’s bags were packed and waiting for him by the front door.


(source)
Cary Grant photographed at Hearst Castle.

"The movie people were always there. My favorite was Cary Grant. He stopped in on a couple of occasions to visit at the gatehouse with us. We’d talk about the movies, life-everything. He was great fun," said Wilfred Lyons.

Sometimes, apparently, too much fun; one day Grant nearly got himself kicked off the property permanently when he and Will Jr. took a small plane up above the estate and, as a prank, bombarded the hanger’s roof with sacks of flour. When they returned, Grant’s bags were packed and waiting for him by the front door.

(source)

August 12th
10:40
Via
danagould:

Two years ago, I was performing at The Punchline in San Francisco, and Robin came to the show with our mutual friend, Dan Spencer.
This particular batch of material was the first time I had touched upon my then still-fresh divorce wounds, and big chunks of it were pretty dark. The next day, I got a text from a number I didn’t recognize. Whoever it was had obviously been to the show and knew my number, so I figured they would reveal themselves at some point and save me the embarrassment of asking who they were.
The Mystery Texter asked how I was REALLY doing. “You can’t fool me. Some of those ‘jokes’ aren’t ‘jokes.” By now I knew that whoever this was had been through what I was enduring, as no one else would know to ask, “What time of day is the hardest?”
He wanted to know how my kids were handling it, all the while assuring me that the storm, as bleak as it was, would one day pass and that I was not, as I was then convinced, a terrible father for visiting a broken home upon my children.
I am not rewriting this story in retrospect to make it dramatic. I did not know who I was texting with. Finally, my phone blipped, and I saw, in a little green square, “Okay, pal. You got my number. Call me. I’ve been there. You’re going to be okay. - Robin.”
That is what you call a human being.

danagould:

Two years ago, I was performing at The Punchline in San Francisco, and Robin came to the show with our mutual friend, Dan Spencer.

This particular batch of material was the first time I had touched upon my then still-fresh divorce wounds, and big chunks of it were pretty dark. The next day, I got a text from a number I didn’t recognize. Whoever it was had obviously been to the show and knew my number, so I figured they would reveal themselves at some point and save me the embarrassment of asking who they were.

The Mystery Texter asked how I was REALLY doing. “You can’t fool me. Some of those ‘jokes’ aren’t ‘jokes.” By now I knew that whoever this was had been through what I was enduring, as no one else would know to ask, “What time of day is the hardest?”

He wanted to know how my kids were handling it, all the while assuring me that the storm, as bleak as it was, would one day pass and that I was not, as I was then convinced, a terrible father for visiting a broken home upon my children.

I am not rewriting this story in retrospect to make it dramatic. I did not know who I was texting with. Finally, my phone blipped, and I saw, in a little green square, “Okay, pal. You got my number. Call me. I’ve been there. You’re going to be okay. - Robin.”

That is what you call a human being.

August 5th
20:48
Do you have anecdotes about your time filming National Treasure?
SEAN BEAN: There was one where I went back to Nic Cage’s house, and we’d had a few drinks, we were playing pool and he accidentally knocked over his prehistoric cave bear skull and smashed it. And he was really upset about it, and the next day went and buried it in a field. (via Reddit AMA)

Do you have anecdotes about your time filming National Treasure?

SEAN BEAN: There was one where I went back to Nic Cage’s house, and we’d had a few drinks, we were playing pool and he accidentally knocked over his prehistoric cave bear skull and smashed it. And he was really upset about it, and the next day went and buried it in a field. (via Reddit AMA)

August 4th
17:31
Via
I’m still really upset and angry. He did it once, the camera happened to be on him, he did it once and I think it’s the funniest joke that’s ever been on our show. - Michael Schur (x)
July 31st
16:18
Via
July 29th
15:00
"In South Korea, there is a train called the cinema train. It’s not the whole train, but one section, they show the movie inside the train from Seoul to Paju. The funny thing is, I was in the cinema train and I saw the movie “The Perks of Being a Wallflower.” And in the beginning of the movie, there’s a subtitle [that said] “This movie has been re-edited for the train’s duration.” So, for the length of the train ride, they cut it down. They should have just found a shorter movie. I was really pissed off. [laughs]” - Bong Joon-Ho.

"In South Korea, there is a train called the cinema train. It’s not the whole train, but one section, they show the movie inside the train from Seoul to Paju. The funny thing is, I was in the cinema train and I saw the movie “The Perks of Being a Wallflower.” And in the beginning of the movie, there’s a subtitle [that said] “This movie has been re-edited for the train’s duration.” So, for the length of the train ride, they cut it down. They should have just found a shorter movie. I was really pissed off. [laughs]” - Bong Joon-Ho.

July 17th
16:40
Via
"But it would have been impossible to cut Chris Evans’s hands off. I mean, he’s a hundred percent muscle and I’m a hundred percent fat, even though we’re both men… You just have to admire him when he wears that form fitting spandex in Captain America.

Actually, it was really hard to hide his muscles, to make him look like he had been in the back of the train for 17 years, and we had to hide him under costumes. Inside the coat, we had to take out the lining and remove the sleeves of the sweater so his muscles looked like the bulk of the sweater. So he was just wearing a vest under that coat the entire movie. It was just his naked arms inside that coat."
—  Snowpiercer director Bong Joon-Ho [x] (via fiveyearmission)
June 15th
11:40
Via

Tiscali: It’s worth noting that many of the cast come from famous or dysfunctional families, a bit like the Tenenbaums.
Wes Anderson: It’s interesting. You know, Ben Stiller, Gwyneth Paltrow, certainly Anjelica Huston, all those families are real achievers, you know, and fame is an issue for their whole families. For Anjelica Huston (daughter of John Huston) I think there’s definitely things for her to relate to in terms of the character that Hackman is playing. Hackman - I didn’t know much of anything about his background, but after we’d finished the movie I saw an episode of Inside The Actors Studio which he did while we were filming. And he talked about his father, and it seemed to really relate to what he’d been playing in the movie - it caught me so much off-guard. You know, there was no dialogue between us about it, but it was clearly something he couldn’t have helped but to tap into.
Tiscali: What did he say in the programme?
Wes Anderson: His father left his family when he was 13 or so, and he just described this moment when Hackman and his friends were playing in the street, and his father drove by. And Hackman saw him driving by, and his father kind of waved from the window but didn’t stop the car. And it was the last he saw him for ten years. And Hackman had really choked up when he was telling it. It was very moving. I’d never heard anything about this at all. And he’d been playing this father who abandons his family for years and years. (via)

Tiscali: It’s worth noting that many of the cast come from famous or dysfunctional families, a bit like the Tenenbaums.

Wes Anderson: It’s interesting. You know, Ben Stiller, Gwyneth Paltrow, certainly Anjelica Huston, all those families are real achievers, you know, and fame is an issue for their whole families. For Anjelica Huston (daughter of John Huston) I think there’s definitely things for her to relate to in terms of the character that Hackman is playing. Hackman - I didn’t know much of anything about his background, but after we’d finished the movie I saw an episode of Inside The Actors Studio which he did while we were filming. And he talked about his father, and it seemed to really relate to what he’d been playing in the movie - it caught me so much off-guard. You know, there was no dialogue between us about it, but it was clearly something he couldn’t have helped but to tap into.

Tiscali: What did he say in the programme?

Wes Anderson: His father left his family when he was 13 or so, and he just described this moment when Hackman and his friends were playing in the street, and his father drove by. And Hackman saw him driving by, and his father kind of waved from the window but didn’t stop the car. And it was the last he saw him for ten years. And Hackman had really choked up when he was telling it. It was very moving. I’d never heard anything about this at all. And he’d been playing this father who abandons his family for years and years. (via)

May 27th
13:20
"Matthew Weiner came to me and said, “Bobby, I want to talk to you… You’re going to pass away in this episode. I’m sorry.” I said, “I perfectly understand.” And he said, “By the way, I’ve always wanted to have you sing. That’s what I remember you from, all your Broadway and theater days. When I hired you, always, in the back of my mind, I wanted you to sing a song, but there was never a place to do it.” And then he came up with this idea. He said, “I am going to make you come back in the last shot in the picture and sing a song to Don.” [Morse sings] “The moon belongs to everyone. The best things in life are free.” They had this wonderful choreographer, Mary Ann Kellogg, whom I knew very well, and hired four or five beautiful dancers who would play secretaries… I dance with them and also sing to Don, and it’s a whole production. I went and learned the song, and I went into the studio and we recorded it with a huge orchestra. Then we rehearsed it on the set for a couple of days, away from everybody else. Nobody knew what was going on… It was just a lovely way, a sweet way, for dear Matt to send me off.” - Robert Morse.

"Matthew Weiner came to me and said, “Bobby, I want to talk to you… You’re going to pass away in this episode. I’m sorry.” I said, “I perfectly understand.” And he said, “By the way, I’ve always wanted to have you sing. That’s what I remember you from, all your Broadway and theater days. When I hired you, always, in the back of my mind, I wanted you to sing a song, but there was never a place to do it.” And then he came up with this idea. He said, “I am going to make you come back in the last shot in the picture and sing a song to Don.” [Morse sings] “The moon belongs to everyone. The best things in life are free.” They had this wonderful choreographer, Mary Ann Kellogg, whom I knew very well, and hired four or five beautiful dancers who would play secretaries… I dance with them and also sing to Don, and it’s a whole production. I went and learned the song, and I went into the studio and we recorded it with a huge orchestra. Then we rehearsed it on the set for a couple of days, away from everybody else. Nobody knew what was going on… It was just a lovely way, a sweet way, for dear Matt to send me off.” - Robert Morse.

May 19th
13:20

“There weren’t a lot of contemporary mechanics introduced, like helicopters and zoom lenses. It was a tableau form of moviemaking, where the actors move in and out of frame, very straightforward. It was supposed to feel like a period piece… There was no discussion of lighting. I just did what I felt like doing. The design came out of the juxtaposition of the bright, cheerful garden party wedding that was going on outside, and the underbelly in this dark house. I used overhead lighting because the Don was the personification of evil, and I didn’t always want the audience to look into his eyes, see what he was thinking. I just wanted to keep him dark… (In those days) screens were so blitzed with light that you could see into every corner of every toilet and closet on the set. I’d always hear, ‘They have to be able to see it in the drive-ins….’ When the dark stuff started to appear on the screen, it seemed a little scary to people who were used to looking at Doris Day movies.” - DP Gordon Willis talking about The Godfather in Peter Biskind’s book Easy Riders, Raging Bulls. Willis died yesterday at the age of 92.

May 4th
13:40
Via
mattybing1025:


In her first and only meeting with the famous macho actor Marlon Brando, early in her career at Paramount, the two were seated next to each other at an Actor’s Guild luncheon. As they sat down, Audrey said a shy hello. Brando said not a single word to her during the entire dinner. For 40 years, Ferrer says, his mother believed that Brando had shunned her. But in the hospital near the end of her life, she received a letter from the famous actor. A mutual friend must have told him of Hepburn’s feelings, and he wrote to set the record straight. Although she might have been shy of him at that luncheon, he recalled that he had been so much in awe of her that he was speechless. He couldn’t think of a single thing to say.

—Excerpt from Audrey Hepburn:  A Son’s Reflections

mattybing1025:

In her first and only meeting with the famous macho actor Marlon Brando, early in her career at Paramount, the two were seated next to each other at an Actor’s Guild luncheon. As they sat down, Audrey said a shy hello. Brando said not a single word to her during the entire dinner. For 40 years, Ferrer says, his mother believed that Brando had shunned her. But in the hospital near the end of her life, she received a letter from the famous actor. A mutual friend must have told him of Hepburn’s feelings, and he wrote to set the record straight. Although she might have been shy of him at that luncheon, he recalled that he had been so much in awe of her that he was speechless. He couldn’t think of a single thing to say.

—Excerpt from Audrey Hepburn:  A Son’s Reflections